Happy Basketball Player

Club players improve their skill mastery with their clubs and their game IQ with us

Players who just want to play for the creative joy of sharing a dance just come along to our sessions

 
Image by Camylla Battani


We work with leisure centres, schools and other venues to run sessions that lift the numbers of people playing team sports like basketball and netball and other physical activities by providing a different type of coaching to the skills mastery typically used by clubs

 
Team Putting Fists Together In Huddle

WE BUILD INCLUSIVE, DIVERSE, KIND, AND HIGH-PERFORMING COMMUNITY

It is harder to coach skills mastery when there is a broad range of skills in a group. This is why skill mastery coaches tend to want players streamed by ability.


It is easier to coach creative adaptability when there is a broad range of skills mastery because less goes to plan. As players improve their ability to creatively adapt when things don’t go to plan they get better at connecting, flowing, and dancing with people who are different from themselves. They are more able to play a positive role in growing an inclusive, diverse, high-performing community.


As players improve their game IQ they improve their ability to connect, flow, and dance with people who are different from themselves and become more able to play a positive role in growing an inclusive, diverse, high-performing community.


To help this process all our sessions are drop-in and open to all. All ages. From beginner to pros. We don’t keep the score so that players focus on doing things before they know what will happen. And everyone plays under our “be kind” rule. “Be kind” means players only compete with those of the same standard or above. They give others space to think. Players don’t use athletic superiority. They think their way around the opposition. They think their way to stop others from scoring. It also means players don’t correct each other’s mistakes, instead, they adapt what they do to make whatever went wrong - work. We play for fun, fitness, and kindness. The only exception is coaches telling players to do more without knowing what will happen and coaches enforcing the “be kind” rule. Our “be kind” rule excludes those who only want to do skills mastery.

 

HOW DOES THE SCIENCE OF THE BRAIN HELP PROFESSIONAL AND EXPERIENCED ATHLETES?

Professional and experienced club players tend to spend much of their time in dedicated, disciplined, practice to master known skills. This mastery is what makes them pros. But, it can also make them overly rigid thinkers dependent on coaches telling them what to do. We help professional athletes grow creative adaptive thinking skills that when combined with their skill mastery lifts their performance to another level.

Players emerging from performance pathways tend to have a big emphasis on skills mastery and athletic ability. We can help them learn the creative adaptability that will be required to play against fellow professionals who can limit the advantages of any athletic superiority.

HOW DOES THE SCIENCE OF THE BRAIN HELP ME TO REIGNITE MY JOY OF PLAYING?

X club players often stop because they think they have reached their level. They can’t see how they get quicker, faster, and stronger. Taller. They can’t see how they can master more skills. We show these players that adding creative adaptability to their skills mastery lifts their potential to a much higher level. We show them that their potential is not capped when they use their brains the way the best of best use theirs.

HOW DOES THE SCIENCE OF THE BRAIN HELP OLDER PLAYERS?

Instead of older players getting frustrated that they can’t do what they used to do they think on their feet to find ways to play that are better suited to what their bodies can do now. The constant search for new ways to adapt to changing bodies is what keeps it interesting. Potential is never capped. We can always adapt.

HOW DOES THE SCIENCE OF THE BRAIN HELP YOUNG PLAYERS?

Younger players get something different from mastering known skills. They enjoy trying things without knowing what will happen. Young players who struggle to pay attention, struggle to follow instructions, to master known skills discover they are can learn another way.

 
Image by Nathan Dumlao

ANY QUESTIONS ARE WELCOME

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